Long Branch and Eatontown man picked up in Child Porn bust

FREEHOLD – A summer-long operation focused on online consumers of child pornography resulted in the arrest of 14 individuals during “Operation School’s Out.” The operation was carried out by the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office Computer Crimes Unit and Monmouth County Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force between July 20, and August 31, 2017. Among those arrested is a college professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, a retired computer scientist who previously held federal government contracts, and an electronics technician, announced Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

Operation School’s Out was designed to reduce online threats to Monmouth County children during one of their most vulnerable times – summer vacation – and to decrease the market for child sexual exploitation by focusing on those individuals seeking out and trafficking in child pornographic materials.

“It is incumbent on everyone, particularly those of us in law enforcement, to protect children from harm and exploitation. To that end, Operation School’s Out caught individuals who shamelessly viewed and shared depraved images of children being sexually abused,” Gramiccioni said. “Our successful operation demonstrates the value of our partnerships with the local law enforcement agencies that help our ICAC Task Force continue to have a vigilant and watchful eye for this extremely damaging criminal activity.”

Assisting in Operation School’s Out were members of the New Jersey State Police Digital Technology Investigations Unit, New Jersey Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory, New Jersey ICAC Task Force, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), Federal Bureau of Investigations, New Jersey State Parole Board, and the Asbury Park, Belmar, Eatontown, Freehold Township, Hazlet Township, Holmdel Township, Howell Township, Keansburg, Keyport, Long Branch, Manalapan Township, Marlboro Township, Middletown Township, Neptune Township, Ocean Township, Red Bank, Sea Bright, Tinton Falls, and Wall Township police departments.

The following individuals were arrested as a result of Operation School’s Out:

• John G. Fenton, 55, of Port Monmouth Road in Middletown, a commercial oil delivery driver, was arrested on August 4, 2017, following the investigation of a CyberTip forwarded by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), which revealed he uploaded child pornography images to Chatstep. Fenton is charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography).

• Henry Gavilanez, 27, Monmouth Place in Long Branch, an unemployed insurance salesman, was arrested on August 31, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. Gavilanez is charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Gavilanez is represented by Edward C. Bertucio, Esq., of Eatontown.

• Emir Gomez, 18, of Route 35 in Eatontown, a landscaper, was arrested on August 17, 2017, following the investigation of a NCMEC CyberTip which revealed he maintained images and videos of child pornography in his Dropbox cloud storage account to which he provided others with access. Gomez is charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Gomez is represented by Allison Friedman, Esq., of Freehold.

• Paul King, 62, of Ocean Avenue in Belmar, a professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, was arrested on August 16, 2017, following an investigation which revealed he used P2P file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. King is charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). King is represented by Daniel Petersen, Esq., of Red Bank.

• Douglas Masto, 70, of Quaker Street in Wall, a self-employed business manager, was arrested on August 10, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. Masto was charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Masto is represented by James Doyle, Esq., of Hackensack.

• Terrance McCuen, 53, of North Ditmar Drive in the Wanamassa section of Ocean Township, a construction site superintendent, was arrested on August 2, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. McCuen was charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography). McCuen was also charged with disorderly persons Possession of Less than 50 Grams of Marijuana. McCuen is represented by Michael Pappa, Esq., of Hazlet.

• Alan Raczek, 27, of Meadow Drive in Tinton Falls, a grocery store cashier, was arrested on July 28, 2017, following an investigation which revealed he possessed numerous items of child pornography. Raczek was charged with one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Raczek is represented by Daniel Petersen, Esq., of Red Bank.

• Rodrigo Roldan, 65, of Coral Way in Neptune Township, a retiree who holds dual citizenship in the U.S. and Colombia, was arrested on July 20, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. Roldan was charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Roldan is represented by Raymond Santiago, Esq., of Freehold.

• Eric C. Scherzer, 38, of Benton Avenue, of the Leonardo section of Middletown, an electronics technician, was arrested on August 23, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. Scherzer was charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Scherzer was also charged with disorderly persons Possession of Less than 50 Grams of Marijuana. Scherzer is represented by Edward C. Bertucio, Esq., of Eatontown.

• James Simmons, 69, of Harding Road in Freehold Township, a retired computer scientist and former federal government contractor, was arrested on July 26, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to make child pornography images and videos available to others online. Simmons was charged with one count of second degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Distribution of Child Pornography) and one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Simmons is represented by Sarah Surgent, Esq., of Freehold.

• Frederick Simzer, 30, of Monique Circle, in Hazlet, a swimming pool maintenance worker, was arrested on August 18, 2017, following the investigation of a NCMEC CyberTip which revealed that he maintained images and videos of child pornography in the cloud storage account associated with his cellular phone service. Simzer also possessed numerous items of child pornography on a personal electronic device. Simzer was charged with one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Simzer is represented by Edwin Wu, Esq., of Freehold.

• Jude I. Taylor, 38, of Bridge Avenue, Red Bank, a landscaper, was arrested on July 25, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to download child pornography images and videos. Taylor was charged with one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Taylor is represented by Kevin Wigenton, Esq., of Red Bank.

• Martin Velazquez-Rodriguez, 52, of 1st Avenue in Asbury Park, a factory worker, was arrested on August 30, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to download child pornography videos. Velazquez-Rodriguez was charged with one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Velazquez-Rodriguez is represented by Kathryn Sylvester, Esq., of Freehold.

• Dale E. Williams, Jr., 46, of Leonard Avenue in Middletown, a construction worker, was arrested on July 21, 2017, following an investigation which revealed that he used P2P file-sharing software to download child pornography images and videos. Williams was charged with one count of third degree Endangering the Welfare of a Child (Possession of Child Pornography). Williams is represented by Richard Lomurro, Esq., of Freehold.

All the defendants were released on the conditions that they have no unsupervised contact with children under the age of 18 and not use the internet. Roldan has the added conditions of surrendering his passport and reporting bi-weekly to a court officer.

If convicted of the second degree Endangering charge, a defendant will face a maximum sentence of 10 years in New Jersey state prison, Megan’s Law, and parole supervision for life. If convicted of the third degree Endangering charge, a defendant will face a maximum sentence of five years in state prison and parole supervision for life. A conviction for disorderly persons Possession of Marijuana exposes a defendant to a maximum sentence of six months incarceration.

All the cases are assigned to Monmouth County Assistant Prosecutor Margaret C. Koping, with the exception of the Fenton case which is assigned to Assistant Prosecutor Martha Nye.

Despite these charges, every defendant is presumed innocent, unless and until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, following a trial at which the defendant has all of the trial rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and State law.

Operation Lights Out nabs 32 in gang probe

FREEHOLD – An investigation launched earlier this year prompted by a spike in shootings in Long Branch, Asbury Park and Neptune Township, resulted in the arrests of members of a Long Branch-based “G-Shine” set of the Bloods criminal street gang along with gang associates. The Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office Gang Unit initiated Operation Lights Out in an effort to identify those responsible for this increased violence and to dismantle their criminal enterprise, announced Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

“Our objective is to continue to do all that we can to make the streets of Monmouth County safe for everyone. Dismantling entrenched criminal enterprises that peddle drugs, unlawfully possess and transfer firearms and inflict violence, remains our priority. We had great support from our law enforcement partners throughout the county and we collectively share this same goal,” Gramiccioni said.

The nine-month investigation led to the arrest of 29 people who now face charges ranging from Racketeering, Distribution of Narcotics, Conspiracy to Distribute and/or Possess Narcotics, Unlawful Possession of Handguns, Unlawful Transfer or Sale of Firearms, Certain Persons Not to Possess Weapons and Hindering Apprehension of Another. The investigation revealed the criminal organization distributed approximately 150-200 grams of powder and crack cocaine a week with an estimated street value of $225,000.00, and approximately 250 packets of heroin per week with an estimated street value of $22,500.00. Operation Lights Out culminated last week with the seizure of two semi-automatic handguns (.40 and .380 caliber), over 200 grams of cocaine, 35 bricks of heroin, approximately $14,000 in cash and three vehicles.

This operation would not have been possible without the support of our partners: Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office, Sheriff Shaun Golden; Monmouth County Correctional Institute, Warden Barry Nadrowski; Marlboro Police Department, Chief Bruce Hall; Belmar Police Department, Chief Andrew Huisman; Freehold Township Police Department, Chief Ernie Schriefer; Long Branch Police Department, Director Jason Roebuck; Freehold Borough Police Department, Chief Glenn Roberts; Little Silver Police Department, Chief Daniel Shaffery; Asbury Park Police Department, acting Chief David Kelso; Neptune Township Police Department, Chief James Hunt; Brookdale Community College Police Department, Captain Robert Kimler; Middletown Police Department, Chief Craig Webber; Holmdel Police Department, Chief John Mioduszewski; Keansburg Police Department, Chief James Pigott; Shrewsbury Police Department, Lieutenant Robert Turner; Wall Township Police Department, Chief Kenneth Brown; Manalapan Police Department, Chief Michael Fountain; Hazlet Police Department, Chief Philip Meehan; and Highlands Police Department, Chief Robert Burton.

The following 18 individuals were members of a Racketeering Enterprise, which involved drugs, guns and gang violence, and arrested as a result of Operation Lights Out:

1. Lamont “Snub” Williams, 32, of Long Branch, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Promoting Organized Street Crime (NJSA 2C:33-30), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d), Possession of a Firearm for an Unlawful Purpose (NJSA 2C:39-4a(1)), fourth degree Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons (NJSA 2C:39-7a), first degree Armed Robbery (NJSA 2C:15-1), Hindering Apprehension of Another (NJSA 2C:29-3a(2)), second degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), second degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet and/or Xanex) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet and/or Xanex) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet and/or Xanex) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

2. Jamire “Jah” Williams, 26, of Long Branch, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d), Possession of a Firearm for an Unlawful Purpose (NJSA 2C:39-4a(1), second degree Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons (NJSA 2C:39-7b), first degree Armed Robbery (NJSA 2C:15-1), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

3. Pernell Scott (aka “90” and “1090”), 32, of Long Branch, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d), second degree Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons (NJSA 2C:39-7b), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

4. Gregory “Wise” McLeod, 40, of Long Branch, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d), second degree Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons (NJSA 2C:39-7b), first degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(1)), first degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(1)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

5. Lawrence “Salaam” Booker, 49, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

6. Jayson Buffaloe, aka (“H.O.” and “Buff,”), 31, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), third degree Hindering Apprehension of Another (NJSA 2C:29-3a(2)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Marijuana) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(11)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with the Intent to Distribute (Marijuana) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(11)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

7. Dashon Coleman, aka “Pop” and “PO,” 30, is charge with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d), second degree Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons (NJSA 2C:39-7b), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet and/or oxycodone) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet and/or oxycodone) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet and/or oxycodone) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

8. Karon “Fly” Covin, 26, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).

9. Dale Davis, aka “Doozie” and “Do,” 37, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), second degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet and/or oxycodone) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet and/or oxycodone) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)),third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet and/or oxycodone) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

10. Michael “Vic” Dismuke, 45, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), first degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(1)), first degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(1)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).

11. Waldyr Donayre, 33, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).

12. Darnell J. Johnson, aka “P.K.” and “Pyrex Kid,” 29, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), second degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).

13. Tyshon Kelley, aka “Q.S.,” “Quiet Storm” and “Black Jack,” 29, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons (NJSA 2C:39-7b) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).

14. Maya Lee, 31, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).
15. Arthur “Art” Ratcliffe, 37, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), Unlawful Possession of a Handgun (NJSA 2C:39-5b), Unlawful Transfer or Sale of a Firearm (NJSA 2C:39-9d), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(5)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (Percocet) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

16. Robert Shannon, aka “Tank,” 41, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

17. Jermaine E. Stovall, 35, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), second degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA2C:5-2).

18. Joseph “Pop Shine” Willis, 31, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), third degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)), third degree Possession with Intent to Distribute a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(3)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (heroin) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

An additional 11 defendants have been arrested and charged with third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and third degree Conspiracy to Possess a Controlled Dangerous Substance (NJSA 2C:5-2/NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)): Howard D. Coleman, 57; Abdelmone M. Elbakry, 48; Dana L. Gilardi, 37; Laura Kale, 43; Kyle J. Manger, 31; Thomas Murphy, 54; Michael Nucci, 56; Joseph Pecoraro, III, 36; Patricia Rodgers, 44; Omar Sanders, 37; Oakley “Buzz” Smith, 65.

The following three defendants remain at-large and are fugitives from justice:

Rory D. Quill, 33, is charged with third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and third degree Conspiracy to Possess a Controlled Dangerous Substance (NJSA 2C:5-2/NJSA 2C:35-10a(1).

Jamie L. Shaw, 37, is charged with third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and third degree Conspiracy to Possess a Controlled Dangerous Substance (NJSA 2C:5-2/NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)).

Rasheen Yarbrough, 38, is charged with first degree Racketeering Conspiracy (NJSA 2C:41-2d), second degree Distribution of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), second degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance with Intent to Distribute (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-5b(2)), third degree Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance (cocaine) (NJSA 2C:35-10a(1)) and Conspiracy to Commit the Foregoing Offenses (NJSA 2C:5-2).

If convicted of any of the first degree charges, each defendant faces a sentence of up to 20 years in a New Jersey state prison and would also be under parole supervision for five years following release from state prison.

If convicted of any of the second degree charges, each defendant faces a sentence of five to ten years in prison.

If convicted of third degree offenses, each defendant faces a sentence of three to five years in prison.

If convicted of fourth degree offenses, each defendant faces up to 18 months in state prison.

The case is assigned to Monmouth County Assistant Prosecutors Merlin Thomas and Emily Cartmell.
Despite these charges, every defendant is presumed innocent, unless and until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, following a trial at which the defendant has all of the trial rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and State law.

Falcons down Spartans 28-17

By Walter J. O’Neill, Jr
For the first time in 11 years the Flacons of Monmouth Regional defeated the Spartans of Ocean Township in a nondivisional football game.  On September 3, the Falcons hosted Ocean Township and beat them 28-17 in what turned out to be an exciting game.

The Shore Conference has what they call “Week Zero” in which a few schools open their football schedules before school actually opens. This is the second consecutive year the two schools have started their seasons in “Week Zero” as they use to play on Thanksgiving Day but Monmouth pulled out two years ago. The last time the Falcons beat the Spartans was in 2006 with a 32-14 victory.

Ocean started the game on offense and were forced into a three and out. Monmouth Regional had a short first series as they also went three and out. Ocean didn’t do much better on their second offensive series, but Monmouth Regional did.

The Falcons started flying high on their second offensive series and never looked back. Going into the halftime break they had a surprising 21-0 lead on Ocean. And what was so shocking is that they did it with many different players and looks.

Klein and his staff made a few great adjustments at halftime and scored 17 unanswered points and were looking strong down to the final minutes. However, Monmouth Regional senior Ian Fitzgerald had a 20-yard touchdown run with 2:39 to play securing the Flacons win.

The Falcons had 134-rushing yards and 104-passing yards. The one weakness in their game plan was being able to hold onto the ball as they had four fumbles, losing two. Fitzgerald was leading rusher with 59, and Dayshawn Porter finished with 37 yards. In passing Monmouth

Regional had three quarterbacks getting yards; Porter completed 2 of 4 for 19 yards, Fitzgerald was 1 for 1 going 63 and Colin Miller was 1 of 2 for 22 yards.

Ocean ran the ball 35 times for 131 yards and completed 10-of 23 passes for 159 yards with one interception. They also had a problem holding onto the ball losing both of their fumbles. Jasher Pena was their leading rusher with 58 yards, his brother Tebor had 30 yards and Nungesser had 27 yards.

Monmouth Regional has a few big reasons for their success this season. They have 12 players over 200 pounds and their biggest player is Bradley Pietz who stands 6’5” and tips the scale at 300 pounds. William Schumacher is 6’1” and 275 pounds and his twin brother Robert, who is 6’0” and 240 pounds.

Another big change at Monmouth Regional is the coaching staff. Larry Nikola has taken over the program and has a new group of assistants who have instilled discipline, teamwork and a winning attitude. They also have a very good group of talented athletes, where they can rotate in three quarterbacks running a shotgun, under center or wildcat formations.

Over on the Ocean sidelines they have a few big shoes to fill this season. Kenny Pickett was their quarterback and team leader for three years, but now is playing Division 1 football. Don Klein has turned to sophomore Robbie Nungesser to take the snaps. Ocean has always had a few big boys on their line, however this season they are missing a few big bodies.

Ocean will be at Wall Township on Friday night, September 8, with kickoff at 7:00 p.m.

Monmouth Regional will host Holmdel on Saturday, September 9, at noon.

Sterns Trailer is proud to recognize Ian Fitzgerald (2) of Monmouth Regional as the Athlete of the Week. On Saturday the Falcons of Monmouth Regional beat Ocean Township 28-17, their first victory over Spartans in 11-years. Fitzgerald ran the ball 14 times for 59 yards and scored twice. He also completed one pass for 63-yards.

Ocean Township sophomore quarterback Robbie Nungesser (4) completed 10 of 23 passes for 159 yards with 1 interception.

Running through the Monmouth Regional defensive line is Jasher Pena (5) of Ocean Township.

One of the three quarterbacks that the Falcons used in the 28-17 win was senior Colin Miller.

Diving in for a Monmouth Regional touchdown was Anthony Guarino (28) a senior running back.

Sea Bright Council news Borough plans town hall to talk about school taxes

By Neil Schulman
Sea Bright — The borough is planning a town hall meeting to discuss what it is doing to address the high school taxes residents pay.

This year, Sea Bright’s share of the Shore Regional budget went up more than 50 percent, from $2.1 million to $3.3 million. The borough sends 31 students to the high school, a cost of $107,000 per pupil.

In 2016, the average home, assessed at $529,000, paid $6,913 in property taxes. This year, it’s $7,729.

“The major increase in your tax bill was driven by the regional school tax,” said Mayor Dina Long at the Sept. 5 Borough Council meeting. A little more than $700 of the $816 increase is from the school tax.

Long said that Sea Bright has filed a petition with the state Commissioner of Education. The borough is also asking residents to take part in contacting legislators.

“We’re hoping, with a letter writing campaign, to put pressure on people in Trenton,” Long said.

Sea Bright has also filed a suit against Shore Regional seeking to get them to change the funding formula. Negotiations with the Board of Education are continuing.

The borough is planning to hold a meeting in early October, with the attorneys representing Sea Bright present to explain the progress that has been made. It is tentatively scheduled for Oct. 4, pending availability of the experts.

Side street parking issues

In the summer, special parking rules go into effect on the side streets in Sea Bright. Church Street resident Chris Doxey said she’d like them to stay in effect all year round, since the situation has changed in recent years.

Because many people raised their houses following Superstorm Sandy, they had a chance to put in driveways, which eliminated about eight or nine parking spaces on her street, Doxey said.

The road is also heavily used by many people and groups who want to go to the church or other area businesses year round. Doxey said some of them have been asked to use the municipal lot a block away but still tie up the street.

“I even had a lady sleep in her car in front of our house,” Doxey said. She walked out one morning, and the woman in the car told her she slept there because of the high cost of renting a room in the area. “She said,‘Can you suggest a good place for breakfast?’”

The issue has been sent to the public safety committee to be reviewed.

Exhibit looks at a rapidly changing Vietnam

West Long Branch — Monmouth University’s Center for the Arts has announced the opening of a new gallery exhibit Transition: Vietnam byMonmouth University’s professors Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen taking place in the Pollak Gallery now through November 30.

Andrew Cohen’s photo, Vendor in Da Lat Market, 2017 Pigment Print

This exhibition includes selected photographs that capture the rapid transformation of Vietnam. The opening reception will be held Sept. 15, from 6 – 8 pm in the Pollak Gallery.

Vietnam has one of the fastest growing economies in the world. Intrigued by the cultural and economic shifts, Monmouth University Department of Art and Design Professors Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph the region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

The photographs in this exhibition capture the multidimensional nature of the country as it continues to grow and evolve.
Mark Ludak is a fine art and documentary photographer. He has worked professionally as a documentary photographer since 1986, concentrating on social, political and environmental conditions in Central America, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and the United States.
His work has been widely published including The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer & Daily News, Time, Der Spiegel, Focus, Utne Reader, In These Times, Mother Jones, Vanity Fair, The Chronicle of Higher Education and ABC News-Nightline. He is a 2016 recipient of the Puffin Foundation Grant for Photography. His photography has been exhibited nationally at the Photographic Resource Center-Boston University, Noyes Museum of Art-Stockton College, Monmouth University-DiMattio Gallery & Ice House Gallery, Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie Mansion.

Most recently Ludak has been photographing for organizations in Nicaragua, Vietnam and Rwanda.

Andrew Cohen’s earliest photographic work was documentation of art historical research in India. Self-taught, these photos served as an inventory of monuments he researched and subsequently published as scholarly book/articles.  Over the years his interest moved to Vietnam, a place he visited six times, and simultaneously his approach to photography progressed into a creative obsession.

Now, sensitive to light, color and movement, photography serves as a means to understand people and environment for Cohen. Cohen describes the country in his words as, “Vietnam is a striking country; to me the food, the coffee, sights, sounds and smells are intoxicating.

The changes are palpable during each visit.  My work focuses on transformation, which I document as the mundane, unceasing human condition.”

The Pollak Gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m.–4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. All gallery events are free and open to the public.

The Philoptochos Society Fall Luncheon and Fashion show

Ocean Township — The Philoptochos Society of the St. George Greek Orthodox Church of Asbury Park will host its Annual Fall Luncheon and Fashion Show on Saturday, October 14, at 11:30 a.m. at the Eagle Oaks Country Club, in Farmingdale.

The day includes a fashion show, an amazing on-premise Gift Auction, Raffles with gifts and prizes along with a Bake Sale filled, among other things, with traditional home baked Greek goodies.

Donation is $55 per person and includes lunch with a choice of Chicken with Mushrooms and Tarragon or Grouper with a Citrus Drizzle.       Proceeds benefit the St George Philoptochos’ charitable works. For reservations, please email: elayna.a.pappas@gmail.com.”

This event is The Philoptochos Society’s largest fund raising event of the year. The Society is the women’s organization of the Saint George Greek Orthodox Church of Asbury Park, N.J., which is located in Ocean Township.

The word “Philoptochos” is Greek and literally translates to “Friends of the Poor.” The Philoptochos Society is a non-profit charitable organization that supports various charitable works locally and throughout the nation. Its mission includes but is not limited to aiding the poor, the hungry, the aged, the sick, the victims of disasters along with, promoting charitable, benevolent and philanthropic purposes of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America.

Former Freeholder passes away at age of 96

On Sept. 1, Theodore “Ted” Narozanick passed away at the age of 96. The WW2 veteran was a former Monmouth County Freeholder, the county’s first Administrator, and a former mayor of Englishtown.

The current Board of Chosen Freeholders issued a statement remembering Narozanick.
“He was a legend, a role model, and a mentor to all who followed in the footsteps he left behind while paving the way for the renaissance of our beautiful county.

“Many of us were lucky enough to call Ted ‘friend.’ Yet even those who just happened upon him on a street corner, in a restaurant, or at the County Fair would tell you that he treated everyone he met as though he had known them for 50 years. In fact, before there was a Pelé, or a Madonna, or a JLo – there was Ted. No last name needed,” the statement read.

Narozanick served in the Army in World War II, where he earned the Bronze Star, and attained the rank of Captain. After returning to his native Englishtown, he served seven years as a councilman; 12 years as mayor; and nine years as a member of the Manalapan-Englishtown Board of Education.

“He stepped into County government as Budget Director in the late 1950’s and went on to become our first County Administrator in 1974 – a role he held for a decade before being elected overwhelmingly to his first of six terms as Freeholder in 1985. To this day, he remains the only freeholder to ever carry the ‘Freeholder Emeritus’ designation,” the Freeholders noted.

“Ted brought that passion to the office as well. Throughout his tenure as freeholder, Ted served as liaison to Human Services, Transportation and to Veterans Affairs. In 2001, the State of New Jersey designated Route 33 between Manalapan and Howell as the

Theodore J. Narozanick Highway – a testament to Ted’s dogged pursuit of improving the county’s infrastructure.”
Narozanick received many other awards and honors during his lifetime.

Before retiring in 2006, Narozanick gave an oral history to the Monmouth County Library System, one of 100 Monmouth County citizens asked to contribute to their “Remembering the 20th Century: An Oral History of Monmouth County” project.

“I think meeting the people and seeing  what I can help them with, regardless of their problem. I have no line of demarcation, so to speak, whether they are a Republican, Democrat, Conservative, Independent, or Liberal. It makes no difference to me. If they are county residents and I can help them, that’s my responsibility and my job. And that’s what I try to do. Not only is it a situation of helping somebody in governmental operations, but in other things,” he said in the interview.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Alzheimer’s Association (www.alz.org) would be appreciated.

Brookdale to Host Massage Therapy Information Session Sept. 12

Community members interested in a new career as a massage therapist are invited to a free information session at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 12 at Brookdale Community College, 765 Newman Springs Road, Lincroft.

Students practice reflexology in Brookdale Community College’s massage therapy training center in Lincroft on Aug. 9. The college’s next massage therapy training program will begin on Oct. 2. Photo by Brookdale Community College.

Attendees can meet with experienced professionals, tour Brookdale’s massage therapy training center and learn more about the benefits of becoming a licensed massage therapist.

Brookdale’s eight-month massage therapy training program, running this year from Oct. 2 to May 23, prepares students to become licensed massage therapists in the state of New Jersey. Courses are taught by industry professionals and include 100 hours of clinical training in local massage therapy practices.

Course topics include Swedish massage, shiatsu, reflexology, sports massage, aromatherapy and other specialties as well as general courses in hygiene, ethics and business practices. The program also includes a comprehensive review for the national Massage and Bodywork Licensing Exam, as well as job placement assistance. Financial aid is available for eligible students.

The Sept. 12 information session will be held in the Student Life Center on Brookdale’s Lincroft campus. Parking is in lots 6 and 7. To RVSP or for more information call Danielle Propert at 732-224-2685 or email dpropert@brookdalecc.edu.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median pay for massage therapists was $19.17 per hour in 2016. Employment in the industry is projected to grow by 22 percent between 2014 and 2024.

Theater review: Fabulous F Theory friendship focus forges fantastic fun

By Madeline Schulman

Long Branch — The first mention of “F” during F Theory is as part of a logic problem Ellie (Megan Loughran) and Marianne (Alex Trow) have for homework as college freshman roommates. However, the important “F” in F Theory is Friendship. Along the way there are nods to Family, Female Firefighters, Fat in the Food Pyramid, and Franklin (Benjamin), but Friendship is paramount, as the audience follows Ellie and Marianne through many decades and across the globe.

Alex Trow and Megan Loughran in F Theory (SuzAnne Barabas photo)

Sometimes their journey is very funny, and sometimes it is poignant. Sometimes the bonds that hold them together are strong, and sometimes they are frayed, but the theme is always their friendship.

Ellie is a former child television star whose sleazy father has squandered her money, while Marianne’s family owns several shopping malls. Ellie gravitates toward music and Marianne toward the social sciences. In spite of all differences, a force even stronger than their love of Shania Twain unites them.

The word that best describes the play starts with a C, not an F: Clever! Megan Loughran and Alex Trow are as clever as they are beautiful and talented, because they wrote F Theory themselves, and no other playwright could have showcased their talents so expertly. They tap dance! They sing (their own songs, I believe)! Ms. Loughran plays the ukulele like a Hawaiian angel.

Jessica Parks has designed a supremely clever set. A few modular pieces and some images projected on the screens in back of the state change the scene from a college dorm to a New York apartment to a luxury honeymoon cottage and many other locales.

There is a clever solution to presenting more than two characters in a play with only two actors, and another clever solution to the many quick costume changes needed. Even the songs played between scenes are cleverly chosen to illustrate the theme of Friendship. Giving details would prevent theatergoers from discovering the charms of the script, and of Ethan Heard’s direction, for themselves.

F Theory is fun, but at its heart are thoughts of the role of Friendship which are not Frivolous.

F Theory runs through Sept. 24. Performances are Thursdays and Fridays at 8 p.m.; Saturdays at 3 and 8 p.m.; and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $46 and are available at 732-229-3166 or online at njrep.org.

 

WLB man accused of sexually assaulting 12-year-old

Following a two month long investigation, Camden County Prosecutor Mary Eva Colalillo, Merchantville Police Chief Wayne Bauer and Cherry Hill Police Chief William Monaghan announced that on Tuesday, August 15,  Anthony M. Woods, a 20-year-old West Long Branch resident, was arrested.

He has been charged with twenty-two criminal offenses including Sexual Assault and Endangering the Welfare of a Child which occurred on diverse dates between May 1 and July 1, 2017 in Merchantville and Cherry Hill, NJ.

Camden County prosecutors say the investigation revealed Woods met a 12-year-old female over the Internet. Through their Internet communication, Woods had directed the exchange of sexually explicit photographs and videos with this 12-year-old victim. Woods also elicited the victim’s home address, picked her up at her residence in Cherry Hill and drove her to Merchantville, where he sexually assaulted her.

As a result, law enforcement executed two search warrants on the morning of August 15, of Woods’ residence and his motor vehicle. The search warrants revealed electronic devices which were seized to be further analyzed at the Camden County Prosecutor’s Office. Woods’ motor vehicle was also seized as evidence.

This investigation was a result of the collaborative efforts of Detectives from the Camden County Prosecutor’s Office Special Victims and Crime

Scene Units, the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office, the Merchantville Police Department, the West Long Branch Police Department, and the Cherry Hill Police Department.

Woods was processed and remanded to the Camden County Correctional Facility.

All persons charged with crimes are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.